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Nothing monumental this week besides the Lil B flop.  I was also able to catch up on some releases that were overlooked in our last post and analyze a New York Times piece.

Keak Da Sneak, P.S.D. Tha Drivah & Messy Marv “Da Bidness Pt 2”598 (26% Digital)

Andre Nickatina & The Jacka  My Middle Name Is Crime” – 2,225 (47% Digital) *Released 12/14*

The Jacka  Flight Risk”1,569 (39 % Digital) *Released 12/14*

Statik Selektah & Freeway The Statik-Free EP”545 (100% Digital) *Released 12/14*

Lil B “Angel’s Exodus” 193 (100% Digital)

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Industry News:

Over the weekend, an article entitled “Music Industry Braces For The Unthinkable” caused a stir when it asserted that digital music sales have peaked and are now at a plateau.  The article quoted Max Hole, CEO of Universal Music Group, who suggested that if anti-piracy acts prevail music, sales will increase as this was the case in South Korea in 2009.

Wired.com writer Elliot Van Buskirk considered the abovementioned article misleading, stating, “There are a few problems with assertions that the sky is falling where music is concerned.  For starters, revenue (including services like Pandora, Spotify, YouTube) is not the same thing as sales (CDs, iTunes, Amazon), so when the Times talks about ‘digital music sales,’ it’s leaving many of the most popular music services out of the discussion.” What Van Buskrirk is referencing is a new model, which is many within the industry are unfamiliar with.  All of the services mentioned in the Wired article present new methods to monetize music and continue growth within the industry during these hard times.  Ever notice how ads run before official videos on YouTube or how you need to sit through 30 seconds of ads ever so often on Pandora?  Believe it or not, those ads help these labels maintain an infrastructure and pay these artists.  So is YouTube and Pandora the future of revenue in the industry or will something else more lucrative come along?  Only time will tell.