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Just when you thought you were safe with E-banking or Just banks in general something like this happens, it was unveiled that there is a new type of “Trojan horse” that steals your bank log-in name and password, then proceeds to drain money from your account — while you’re logged in.

The new Trojan, called URLZone, features a number of innovations not widely seen in Internet crime. For example, the Trojan can estimate precisely how much money to steal based on how much paper you have in your account, and can even siphon money in small increments to evade detection.

It’s a next generation bank Trojan,” Yuval Ben-Itzhak, chief technology officer at Finjan, a cyber-security firm, told CNET News. “This is part of a new trend of more sophisticated Trojans designed to evade antifraud systems.”

A Trojan horse is a type of malware — or malevolent software — that allows criminals unauthorized access to the user’s computer system. Details of URLZone appear in a new report by Finjan’s Malicious Code Research Center.

URLZone takes advantage of vulnerabilities in web browsers, including Firefox and Internet Explorer, then executes a program on Windows systems — which means if you’re running a Mac, you’re safe. For now.

As we covered in previous reports, cybercrime pays,” Finjan researchers wrote in the report. “Financial data remain the prime target. Cybergangs and their methods keep on refining their attacks to generate as much income as possible, while avoiding detection.”

During 22 days in mid-August, the cyber-crooks operating URLZone stole nearly $438,000, according to the security company. The bad guys infected about 6,400 computer users, according to PC World, and stole an average of $1,750 per day. Before we had to worry about the Nigerian scammers telling you they were exiled from being prince or princess of their country and wanted you to hold the money for them in YOUR account, now we have “cybergangs” stealing your funds, the cyber world is such a hard place to live in.