suspect11
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Its been about a month now and the oil spill seems incurable, its sad because this could have been prevented with a piece of equipment that cost $500,000. But that is too much to spend for a company that makes over hundreds of billions of dollars in profit every year and has seen record profits every year since 1999.

Now that BP’s latest try to plug the blown-out well won’t happen until at least Tuesday. Officials are considering some drastic and risky solutions: They could set the wetlands on fire or flood areas in hopes of floating out the oil.

But they warn an aggressive cleanup could ruin the marshes and do more harm than good. The only viable option for many impacted areas is to do nothing and let nature break down the spill. More than 50 miles of Louisiana’s delicate shoreline already have been soiled by the massive slick unleashed after BP’s Deepwater Horizon burned and sank last month. Officials fear oil eventually could invade wetlands and beaches from Texas to Florida.

Louisiana is expected to be hit hardest. Oil that has rolled into shoreline wetlands now coats the stalks and leaves of plants such as roseau cane — the fabric that holds together an ecosystem that is essential to the region’s fishing industry and a much-needed buffer against Gulf hurricanes. Soon, oil will smother those plants and choke off their supply of air and nutrients.