Snitching On Yourself By Anthony Garcia

 |  April 22, 2011
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snitch

This LA gangbanger just redefining snitching on yourself.  I learned something from this story.  After commiting murder do not, I repeat do not, get the murder scene tattooed on your chest.  It might end up biting you in the a$$ in the old evidence department.  Anthony Garcia…you’re better than this.  According to The LA Times:

Homicide Lt. Dave Dolson said gang members frequently get symbolic tattoos to bolster their street cred: three dots on the hand to signify “mi vida loca” (“my crazy life”), sketches of prisons where they’ve done time, gang insignia prominently stenciled on their heads and torsos.

But a tattoo laying out a detailed picture of a crime scene is something far outside the norm. “I haven’t seen it before, and I haven’t heard of anything like it either,” Dolson said.

Garcia’s tattoo shows a man with the body of a peanut being hit by bullets and falling back toward the liquor store. In gang slang, the word “peanut” is used to derisively describe a rival gang member.

Lloyd had been at the scene of the Pico Rivera killing as a station sergeant. After he recognized it in the tattoo, the 30-year veteran called up the cold case file. He pored over the crime scene photographs alongside the photos of Garcia’s chest. He also drove to the site of the slaying.

“I worked Pico Rivera a lot of years, so I’m pretty familiar with that area,” he said. “It was incredible.”

With the help of major crimes investigators, deputies found Garcia living with relatives in La Habra. They arrested him and began setting up a ruse to secure his conviction.

A detective posing as a Los Angeles gang member who’d been arrested on attempted murder charges was placed in Garcia’s Norwalk station jail cell. He soon got Garcia talking, sheriff’s investigators said. Garcia was proud, and he bragged about the shooting. He didn’t know the conversation was being recorded and that it would soon be played for a jury.

But perhaps it was all bound to end up this way, said Capt. Mike Parker.

“Think about it. He tattooed his confession on his chest. You have a degree of fate with this,” Parker said. “The detective who spotted it had been a Pico sergeant who went on to become a homicide sergeant. I never worked Pico station. I never would have recognized that Pico liquor store.”