Over the summer, Eminem promised that his Shady Records imprint would release a compilation titled Shady XV for Record Store Day Black Friday, November 28th. And now Em is treating everyone with the comp’s second track, the Detroit rap heavy “Detroit Vs. Everybody”. The track, loaded with many all-star Detroit rappers, is sure to make the D proud. Em is joined by Royce Da 5’9”, Big Sean, Danny Brown and DeJ Loaf for the Motor City anthem. Listen after the jump!

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Day 1 of iStandard’s ‘Beast of The Beast’ 5 event kicked off at the world famous Webster Hall in NYC with a live ‘Behind The Rhymes’ Interview w/ Jay-Z’s longtime engineer and overall expert sound technician, Young Guru. Interviewed by former ‘Editor and Chief’ of the now defunct Scratch Magazine Jerry Barrow. Read More

Obie-Trice-Bup420

 

Artist: Obie Trice

Album: Bottoms Up

Label: Black Market Entertainment

Date: 4/3/12

 

“O-Trice, Back At It!”  Six years after the release of Second Rounds On Me, Obie Trice is back with his third album, Bottoms Up, which keeps in line with his other alcohol-inspired album titles.  Ten years ago Eminem memorably sampled the line “Obie Trice, real name, no gimmicks” from Obie Trice’s “Rap Name” on “Without Me.”  Now, Obie maintains his “no gimmicks” attitude on this project and even brings the line back on “Ups & Downs.”

His past albums, Cheers and Second Rounds On Me, featured many collaborations and with only four features on this sixteen track album Obie Trice seems more comfortable showcasing his lyrics and flow on his own.  The subject matter of the album is light and ranges from the type of woman Obie fantasizes about on “I Pretend” to the story of his career and relationships within the rap game.

Although Obie Trice split from Shady Records in 2008, Eminem has a strong presence on the album through samples, shout outs, production, and a feature.  The project kicks off with a Dr. Dre produced introduction on which Obie spits a verse letting us know that on this album he is “simply spittin whats in O-Trice’s system.”  He then thanks all those who have helped and supported his career so far.  The intro is followed by the energetic “Going Nowhere.”  Obie shows his confidence and lets us know he’s “in this to win this” over Eminem’s production.  The first single off the project, “Battle Cry” features Adrian Rezza and was produced by his brother Lucas Rezza.  It was released last summer.  On the track, Obie reminisces about his critics and past albums.  He starts each verse with his catchy battle cry of “O-Trice, Back At It” reminding us of his perseverance in the game.  The second single “Spend The Day” features singer, Drey Skoni and was produced by Detroit rap/production trio NoSpeakerz, who produced a third of the album.  The track tells the story of what its like for a woman to spend a day with Obie.  “Spill My Drink” is a catchy track on which Obie mentions his album delays and who has stuck by him through all this time.

On the highly anticipated Statik Selektah produced “Richard,” Obie and Slim take it back to “Shady 1.0” with alternating verses packed full of references about them being “dicks” with Eminem on the chorus.  Obie comments on Interscope, as a label, and his issues with the industry on “Ups & Downs” and “Hell Yea.”  He also addresses his relationships with Eminem and Dre accompanied by a few Dre and Em samples on “Hell Yea.”  Trice and the late MC Breed represent for the Michigan rap scene on “Crazy.”  “Lebron On” is the story of Obie’s career told through basketball metaphors and comparisons to Lebron.  It discusses overcoming obstacles and being underrated and hated on.  Obie ends the last track with a shout out to “the G-Unit he knows” and a request to follow him on twitter @RealObieTrice.

A few tracks such as “BME Up” or “Secrets” would have been a good fit for a 50 Cent verse or chorus, but they are solid tracks anyway.  There is an early 2000s classic feel to the album which maybe because he started the project so long ago. Obie’s verses are authentic and unaffected and uninfluenced by current music.  The overall production of the album is solid and a good fit for Obie’s style.  Many tracks have memorable witty lines and metaphors like “The way I hurt em with the ‘Yeshe call me Amber Rose.”  Although some tracks are more memorable than others, the project is comprised of well-written verses, catchy choruses and diverse flow, and definitely worth a listen.

 

 


Purchase Bottoms Up on iTunes

 

 

Right now, the house that Eminem built, better known as Shady Records has a new set of faces with a new name; Shady 2.0.

But before the 4-headed monster recognized as Slaughterhouse, and the rapid-fire specialist, Yelawolf all signed their government names onto Shady contracts; the original stable of verbal assassins included one Obie Trice. Read More

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