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This dude hands down has to be one of the most entertaining rappers ever to interview (see iHipHop Interview).   Here are a couple of quotes from Maurice Garland’s OZONE interview prior to him violating the terms of his bond. He asks for Jesse Jackson’s assistance and in the next sentence talks about jerking off for the next year.  My favorite is the re-modified Martin Luther King quote.   I’m truly going to miss quotes like these from artists. Classic!

The current situation you’re in is similar to what we saw Tupac going through 15 years ago. People already compare you to him musically, but has this comparison crossed your mind at all?
It always crosses my mind. Every time I see ‘Pac on TV I think to myself, “I’m going through the same thing he was.” Hopefully somebody comes along and buys me out of my contract just like [Suge] did for ‘Pac. (laughs) Puffy, 50, Jigga, I hope y’all listening. I’ma be the biggest nigga in the game when I get home. Come buy me out of this pain and let me make some billions for y’all niggas. I might be gone for a while but that’s gonna make me the biggest nigga in the game. I’m coming out hard, man.

Well, earlier you said you didn’t appreciate how Trill was treating you. The names you just mentioned don’t have the cleanest records when it comes to being label CEOs either.
I got lawyers now. I ain’t gonna let a nigga whip me on contract no more. If he sees my best interest and can make me what I want to be, I’ma roll with him. Fuck what he did to the last nigga. It’s about me trying to get on, fuck them other niggas.

But really, I’d feel like I’m just punching these crackers back in the face for what they’re doing to me. This is my first conviction. Jesse Jackson needs to be down here screaming for me too. This my first conviction and I’m doing jail time. I know millions of people with paper on them for gun and drug charges, but [I got sentenced] because of who I am.

They’re just trying to make an example out of me, but it’s gonna blow back up in their face. I’m not a convicted felon, so I [should be] eligible for papers. Simple as that. I’m gonna make them afraid to look out their window at night. I’m coming home with a grudge on my shoulder.

Do you look at all of this happening as a sign? Maybe you needed to slow down in some areas of your life?

I’m just accepting it. I see it as God tapping me on my wrist a little bit. He’s sending me to jail so I can learn the hard way. But when I get out, it’s my chance to show him I’m thankful. It’s coming back triple. I think this jail shit is about to take me farther than being on the streets for three years could’ve taken me. Everything happens for a reason. It’s fucked up that it has to work that way, but I think it’s gonna work out in my favor. Staying four years on the street, still putting out just one album, or going to jail 10-11 months with a CD coming out 2 weeks after that? That’s high publicity. Jail only makes you sell more records. Niggas are already asking to book me for the first Saturday I’m home. Offering [amounts of] money I’ve never gotten before [for shows]. I’m just gonna be in there chilling, looking at pictures, beating my dick to bad bitches.

Besides that, have you given any thought to what you’re gonna do to pass the time? Many artists who get locked up say they don’t feel inspired to write music while they’re in there.

Lift weights, sleep. I don’t be having no vibe in there to write music. I don’t write music until I’ve been [in prison] for about a month. I do always end up writing music, but it’s jail-oriented [music], and I’m more versatile than that.

Is there anything else you want to share?

The name of my next album is Free At Last. [impersonates Martin Luther King] Free at last, free at last…that’s yo muthafuckin’ ass. //

Here is the official statement from Lil Boosie‘s camp regarding the increase of his 1-year sentence agreement.  Free Boosie!


Yesterday, November 9, 2009, Torrance Hatch, better known as the hit-making Rapper, Lil’ Boosie, was sentence to four years in the Louisiana Department of Corrections for 3rd Offense Possession of Marijuana, a felony in Louisiana. Judge Richard “Chip” Moore of the East Baton Rouge Parish Court handed down a ten year sentence today, but suspended six years, which will allow Hatch be released in as little as 16 months on parole or approximately 21 months with good behavior.

When Hatch originally entered a guilty plea in September, the Court promised Hatch a sentence of two years if Hatch abided by all conditions of bond pending sentencing. These conditions included an electronic ankle monitoring device and prior court approval to leave home for any purpose, including promotion of his Top Ten release of “SuperBad: The Return of Boosie Bad Azz.” Hatch violated this agreement and thus received a more severe sentence than originally contemplated.

Hatch AKA Lil Boosie was remanded yesterday.

Boosie, himself, has written the following statement:
“I made some very foolish choices, but I was doing the best I could to provide for my family before I went away to jail. Clearly I exercised terrible judgment and I hope to get the opportunity to prove that I can make great decisions for my family and the community in the future. Boosie may be gone but he won’t be forgotten. He recently put the finishing touches on the feature film: “Ghetto Stories: The Movie” due out early 2010 and has just wrapped shooting the DVD: “Boosie The Last Days.”